Holy Week, Bishop’s Visit, Baptism

We have reached the half-way mark of our Lenten journey, and soon Holy Week will be drawing near.

This year, St. Philip’s Holy Week will begin with a Palm Sunday, April 9th, 11:00 am, visit from Bishop Don Phillips, Bishop of the Diocese of Rupert’s Land. Bishop Phillips will be preaching during the service, while we as a parish participate in the litany and procession of palms. After the service we will spend some time together over coffee and dessert.

Monday of Holy Week, April 10, 2017, will be the second last of Reverend Donald’s lectures on Eucharistic Eating. This week we will be looking at the concepts of death and sacrifice in our eating, and how they relate to the Eucharist.

On Thursday, April 13th, 7:00 pm, we will celebrate the institution of the Lord’s Supper during our Maundy Thursday Eucharist. Maundy Thursday is also the day when we hear again Jesus’s new Commandment.

I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” (John 13:34-35) NRSV

Following the service we will be stripping the altar as we prepare for Good Friday.

Friday, April 14th, 11:00 pm we are holding our Good Friday Service. This is a solemn service where we will take time to contemplate and reflect on the death of Jesus Christ.

Holy Week, Empty tune.
The Angel with the women at the empty tomb.

Sunday, April 16th, 11:00 am, is our Easter Sunday Celebration. We will celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. We will welcome new people into the family of God through the waters of Baptism. Following the Eucharist we will gather in the Memorial Hall to continue the Easter Feast.

We hope you will be able to join us. If you have any questions, feel free to call St. Philip’s at 204-237-3650, or email us at stphilipsnorwood@shaw.ca

Eucharistic Eating

Eucharistic Eating (Lecture Series)

Purpose of the Series

To place our daily eating into the context of the Eucharist and to bring the Eucharist into our daily eating.

Thanksgiving (Eucharisto) is at the heart of Eucharistic eating.

Each lecture will move from the general idea of thanksgiving into the idea of thanksgiving in Holy Eucharist. Each of the potential ideas on any given week will be linked to thanksgiving.

The lectures will be held on Monday’s beginning on March 6, 2017. Lectures will begin at 7 pm and run until roughly 8:30 pm each week.

Eucharist - The Cup remembering

Week One – eucharistic eating

Small letters to indicate that the focus will be on the concept of thanksgiving more than on the Eucharistic Meal.

This week will also provide a general  overview of the series.

Week Two – Hunger

How does hunger prevent thanksgiving (and perhaps vice versa)

Hunger and Pain

Hunger as a weapon

Agony of starvation

Hunger as time consuming

Homelessness & hunger

Week Three – Dining Together

fraternal meals 

family dining

speed of life

Food Courts

Eucharist as meal of community

Week Four – Fasting-Feasting

Food moralism

The need for fasting/feasting

Week Five – Sacrifice & Death

All eating involves death

vegetarianism and veganism

Food as medicine

Christ’s sacrifice

Week Six – Eucharistic Eating

Historical Development of Eucharist

Shared Meal

Salvation in the Eucharist.

Presence

Some of the ideas found in various weeks may also apprear in other weeks, but I haven’t included them for brevity’s sake. This outline will undoubtedly change over the next 10 weeks, as further reading brings clarity of confusion.

Thoughts, comments, and questions welcomed.

Christmas Eve & Christmas Day

Christmas Eve

St. Philip’s invites you to join us in celebrating the birth of Christ. We will be holding service on both Christmas Eve and Christmas Morning. On Christmas Eve we will enjoy half an hour of carol singing beginning at 7:00 pm, followed by our celebration of Eucharist, beginning at 7:30 pm. If you are looking for a place to celebrate, to hear once again, or perhaps for the first time, the story of Christmas, please come and join us as we recall the birth of Jesus.

Christmas Eve
The Chancel prepared for Christmas  services

Christmas Day:

We will also be celebrating Christmas on Christmas Day itself. This also is a service of Holy Eucharist. The Service begins at 11:00 am.

St. Philip’s is located at 240 Tache, on the corner of Tache Avenue and Eugenie Street.

You can also follow what’s happening at St. Philip’s by following our Facebook Page.

Music, Remembrance – Evensong Sermon.

This sermon on Music and Remembrance is being preached bySt. Philip’s Deacon Tanis at St. Luke’s Anglican this afternoon

SERMON –   MUSIC AND REMEMBRANCE

RCCO Service November 6th St. Luke’s Anglican

 

May the words of my mouth and meditations of all our hearts be acceptable in your sight O Lord, our Rock, our Strength and our Redeemer.  AMEN

Thank you for inviting me to be part of this service.

 

Today we are here to worship together, remembering those who gave their lives for

our freedom, remembering those who are presently serving in the Canadian Armed Forces, Continue reading

Sermon – Luke 19:1-10 Zacchaeus

zac1October 30 2016   Luke 19: 1-10        ZACCHAEUS CLIMBED THE SYCAMORE TREE         Rev. Deacon Tanis Kolisnyk

Luke 19:1-10
19:1 He entered Jericho and was passing through it.
19:2 A man was there named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector and was rich.
19:3 He was trying to see who Jesus was, but on account of the crowd he could not, because he was short in stature.
19:4 So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to see him, because he was going to pass that way.
19:5 When Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down; for I must stay at your house today.”
19:6 So he hurried down and was happy to welcome him.
19:7 All who saw it began to grumble and said, “He has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner.”
19:8 Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, “Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much.”
19:9 Then Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, because he too is a son of Abraham.
19:10 For the Son of Man came to seek out and to save the lost.”

Zacchaeus climbs the tree
Zacchaeus climbs the Sycamore tree to see Jesus

May the Words of my mouth and meditations of all our hearts be acceptable in your sight O Lord our Rock, our strength and our Redeemer.  AMEN.

I was so excited when I saw the Gospel that I was assigned to preach on today.  Zacchaeus has

always been a person in the bible that has intrigued me.  He is a curious sort of guy, a complex

character. He was a chief tax-collector in Jericho, a descendant of Abraham and the biblical account

gives us an example of Jesus’ personal, earthly mission to bring salvation to the lost. 

 We have to remember that tax collectors were despised as traitors. They worked for the Roman

Empire, not for their Jewish community, so this is context of the readings today. The people thought of

him as corrupt.  I found out in one of my Church History texts that in Jericho at that time in history the

lucrative production and export of balsam was centered in Jericho, so you can imagine that tax

collection would have carried both importance and wealth.

So here is this short, wealth guy, who decided to climb a Sycamore tree to see Jesus in the midst

of the crowd. I wondered why the tree specifics were named in the Gospel reading, and I know nothing

about Sycamores – so a bit of snooping told me that they grow to 20 m tall and they have a considerable

spread with a dense round crown of branches.  So this tree was probably fairly substantial to hold a

person. In the Bible, the sycamore is referred to seven times in the Old Testament and once in the New

Testament.  Though it was not as common in Palestine, the sycamore was a very popular and valuable

fruit tree in Jericho and Canaan.  In Kenya the Sycamore tree is considered sacred. It was often called

“Tree of Life”, or “Origin”. Another interesting fact, the Gikuyu Tribe of Kenya have been thought to

have been slaves in Egypt – when they fled the Pharaoh they fled North, while Moses and his people fled

south.

So why name the Sycamore Tree in the gospel story?  I think it is named because roots run deep

to sustain such a tree and this tree is rooted in history to the time of old testament and the people of

that time.  Zacchaeus climbed a sacred tree to look upon Jesus Christ.  He hung out on a limb to see

Jesus and he wanted Jesus to see him too.

Jesus called Zacchaeus by name. He made eye contact, and spoke to him face to face. He was

glad to see him – at least that is the tone I take from the Gospel today. This was not an interruption in

the Messiah’s schedule.

Jesus calls out to him  – he has time for those who seek Him.

Getting that attention, oh yes, some of us are better at that than others, this is true.

We have 5 small grand kids all under 5, so you can imagine when we have a family get together there is

a lot of activity, noise, and if the grandkids are all talking at the same time, it is tough for me to give

them individual attention.

One of my grandsons, he is the loudest of them all and in the middle of the

age group, will take his little hands and put them on my face and say “Grandma…… “

This may happen in the midst of Lorne and I getting supper for 14 on the table – he will search us out

and basically  say by his gesture  “Listen to ME”  not them.  ME.  Very sweet, very direct, and yes, I

stop what I am doing and I give him my total attention. He knows how to communicate in a busy

environment.   – JUST LIKE ZACCHAEUS

 LOOK at ME !!!-  Zacchaeus did the same thing.       Zacchaeus climbed a tree to get a

look at Jesus, but he also wanted Jesus to look at him. The Savior did look.  He showed his Love by

acknowledging this short guy hanging out on a limb in the Sycamore tree.  When Jesus reached the spot,

he looked up into the branches, addressed Zacchaeus by name, and told him to come down, for he

intended to visit his house. The crowd was shocked that Jesus, a Jew, would consider being a guest of a

tax collector – WHAT!!! You have got to be kidding!!! This thought was certainly being murmured

around the crowd.

Zacchaeus was curious….. that is a good trait, even if you are a tax collector.

Maybe, especially if you are a tax collector. I think that God has placed in the soul of every human being a desire to

connect to the Creator.  Steve Andrews a baptist pastor says it very well:

Some fight it, ignore it, and deny it, but the Scripture is clear. Human beings

are spiritual beings and no amount of worldly success or possessions can satisfy

 the deepest longing of the soul to know God.

The gospel indicates to us that God chose to associate with (and to save) this man whom He

knew to be an unworthy sinner. The others people were not pleased about this. They were angry,

because they did not see themselves as sinners, but as the righteous. Earlier this month we discussed

wealth and how it is not a sign of God’s favor. We talked about Jesus declaring that it is nearly

impossible for the rich to enter the kingdom of God.

This gospel brings balance – a story about another rich man who receives Jesus with joy, who promises to give half of his wealth to the poor and to restore

fourfold any amount to those he may have defrauded. It is not about wealth, it is not about worthiness,

it is about saying YES Lord – LOOK AT ME, Change my heart, and welcome me in – a sinner.

 We need to see in this gospel message that Jesus came to save those who are unworthy, those who are sinners. Yes Jesus responds….. I see you.  Come to me….. Yes I have time for you…. Even you.

Let us Pray:

In your Son you seek out and save the lost, O God,

and invite us to the banquet of your eternal home.

Visit your people with the joy of salvation.

Help us to be curious and rejoice in the riches of your forgiveness.

Help us to reach out and be a welcoming community, willing to share with others  the fest of your love. Amen.

November Events Saint Philip’s

There are three events coming up at Saint Philip’s this November that you may be interested in.

The first two events take place on November 11th. These events start off with our Remembrance Day service at 11am. We are honoured that we get to share this day with the members of the St. Boniface-Norwood Legion Branch #43. There is a long history between Saint Philip’s and the Legion, and one which we strive to maintain. One thing to know about this Remembrance Day service is that you should arrive early if you need to sit, because the building fills to overflowing. Fortunately, as last year, there is televised overflow in our Memorial Hall. Continue reading

Fall Welcome Back Barbecue

This Sunday September 18th, St. Philip’s will be holding our annual fall BBQ. This BBQ marks the return to regular activities at the church. If you check out our post on last September’s happenings you’ll see many of the groups that call St. Philip’s home.

Doors are open at 10:00 am.  The service begins at 11 am. Immediately following the service there is a BBQ on the front lawn. We should be ready to start eating at about 12:30 pm. Hot dogs, hamburger, and buns will be provided.  We hope you can join us at 11:00 am for our celebration of Holy Eucharist, but if you can’t please feel to swing by and join us for the BBQ. We would also like to encourage people to bring potluck salads, beverages or desserts for the BBQ. However, if you are unable to do so, we still invite you to stop for the chance to meet your neighbours at St. Philip’s.

Swing BBQ for fall
Come on out for the Fall barbecue at St. Philip’s

The Barbecue will go on rain or shine. If it is raining, we will eat inside in the Memorial Hall.

Fall at St. Philip’s

Our Fall Barbecue is just the beginning of our year. We will once again be holding our Rememberance Day service in support of the St. Boniface-Norwood Legion, on November 11. On November 11 we are also holding our annual Roast Beef Dinner. Two weeks later on the 25th of November we will be welcoming J.D. Huston as he performs his one man play, Screwtape, based on the works of C.S. Lewis. More details will be made available as we come closer to those dates.

September also marks the return to regular uses from some of St. Philip’s tenants. The Bolero Dance Theatre will be back in the swing of things. As well, Sparks, Brownies, Guides, Pathfinders and Rangers are on the go. Saturday evenings and Sunday mornings St. Philip’s also plays host to The Theotokos of the Life-Giving Spring Mission.

Kyle Mason Don Amero Visit

Lasting and healthy change is difficult to achieve because there are so many forces that work to keep change from happening. The societal, cultural, and/or personal forces must be resisted by the person or organization that decides the change they desire is necessary. However, most of the time it is not enough to simply make this decision and put forward this effort by oneself.  Support is often needed in these times of change so that the forces trying to stop it do not become overwhelming. St. Philips will be hosting two people who try to, Kyle Mason and Don Amero, at our 11am service on July 17th. These individuals have devoted themselves to be supporters of lasting and healthy change within their communities.

Kyle Mason North End Family Centre
The North End Family Centre, where Kyle Mason serves as director.

Kyle Mason

Before they arrive it would be good for us to get to know a bit about these men so they do not spend their whole time simply explaining who they are. Kyle Mason will be sharing a message with us when he visits on July 17th. Kyle Mason is Winnipeg born and was raised in the North End by a single parent family. As Kyle grew he noticed that it was not just his family that struggled with poverty but many throughout his community. During this tough time in his life Kyle Mason was able to find support and community from a local church youth group. Having a supportive community during a difficult time obviously stuck with Kyle as when he moved back to the community he knew exactly how he wanted to help it out.

Kyle Mason decided to help his community by starting the North End Family Centre. It is within this organization that Kyle, his staff, volunteers, and everyone who comes to the centre work on creating a loving and safe community. This community was formed by the North End Family Centre’s ability to hear the community they wished to serve. Kyle explains, “We listen to the people that we serve. We ask what they want and what they need and move to do that. And when the community feels like they have real input, which they do, they respond.” The response Kyle refers to is that despite only having a starting location 1000 square feet they were receiving up to 1400 visits a month. This response allowed the North End Family Centre to expand to their new location so they might serve more people and help support this ever growing community.

Don Amero

Don Amero, the Juno nominated man who will be providing the music to our service on July 17th, grew up in the North End community like Kyle Mason. Don Amero also is filled with the desire to give back to his community. With this desire in mind Don works in his local community; a good example of this is last year where Don took the responsibility on to help mentor some middle school kids at Niji Mahkwa. It is here the students collaborated with Don Amero to make a song about missing and murdered indigenous women titled, Never Alone.

Don also sees his community in a broader sense and has toured the country with country music star Brett Kissell last year. They toured through many indigenous communities to do their part to support the reconciliation conversation that was spreading throughout the country. Don Amero has this to say about reconciliation, “Reconciliation is relationship, and I think that what Brett and I want to do is be a living example of two guys from different hoods, different places, different backgrounds coming together to do something really great for people.”

The relationships these two men have formed with their communities is an inspiring story we will hear more of on July 17th. We hope many will come out to be inspired by their stories and song so that we can all figure out how we can help support change in our country, city, neighbours, and selves.

Swing into Summer Barbecue

Swing into Summer Barbecue

Next Sunday, June 12th, St. Philip’s will be holding our annual summer BBQ.

Doors are open at 10:00 am.  The service begins at 11 am. Immediately following the service there will be a BBQ on the front lawn. We should be ready to start eating at about 12:30 pm. Hot dogs, hamburger, and buns will be provided.  We hope you can join us at 11:00 am for our celebration of Holy Eucharist, but if you can’t please feel to swing by and join us for the BBQ. We would also like to encourage people to bring potluck salads, beverages or desserts for the BBQ. However, if you are unable to do so, we still invite you to stop for the chance to meet your neighbours at St. Philip’s.

Swing BBQ
Swing into summer at the St. Philips BBQ

The Barbecue will go on rain or shine. If it is raining, we will eat inside in the Memorial Hall.

Flowers Springtime

Let all creation help you to praise God. Give yourself the rest you need. When you are walking alone, listen to the sermon preached to you by the flowers, the trees, the shrubs, the sky, the sun and the whole world. Notice how they preach to you a sermon full of love, of praise of God, and how they invite you to proclaim the greatness of the one who has given them being.
Saint Paul of the Cross

sign with flowers
The flowers are another welcoming sight at St. Philip’s

Last Wednesday, with the weather finally warm, though wet, we planted flowers here at St. Philip’s. Despite the rain it was a delightful event. Margaret Brook, one of our parishioners organized the planting. Rev. Donald was there and we were joined by members of the 153rd Sparks, and Brownies along with a couple of their leaders. It is always great when members of the various communities get the opportunity to get to know each other a little bit better. We thank them for their willingness to partner with us. A special thanks to the Sparks and Brownies who outdid themeselves in their desire to help with the planting.

Green Door Flowers
This cluster is just next to the green door that leads to our offices.

As the quote at the top says, we believe that beauty is one of the ways in which God is made known to us. We hope that people who pass by the building or who are waiting for their bus may find their days brightened by the flowers, trees, and other plants around the building. We hope that they bring joy and gladness every day.

Flowers and Guy Letourneau’s Memory

This spring the planting of the flowers was a melancholy affair. For many years our caretaker Guy Letourneau had looked after the grounds and flowers. Sadly, just a couple of months ago, Guy discovered he had cancer. It was an aggressive cancer and on April he entered his eternal rest.

Guy took great pride and care with the grounds and the flowers.  Much of the reason that the grounds around St. Philip’s have always looked so beautiful was through Guy’s efforts. We miss him not only for his efforts but for his friendly, welcoming personality that had been an important part of St. Philip’s for the past decade.

Rest in Peace Guy, and rise in Glory.