September Happenings

As September approaches it is time for new events and for regular routines to return. We hope that everyone has had a restful summer that has allowed them time to recharge their batteries before the return of work or school and other weekly activities. Here at St. Philip’s we are in the planning stages for getting things off the ground. At the same time some of the groups that meet here at the church will be starting up their routines as well.

September Parish Happenings:

Earlier in the year, we put our Wednesday noon-hour Eucharist on hold. We will be starting it up again in the next few weeks with a couple of twists. The first is that it will be moved to Tuesday at Noon from Wednesday at One. The second is that we will be using the Narrative Lectionary, instead of the Revised Common Lectionary. This is to give our parish a chance to look at a different approach to the Lectionary. We will still be using the RCL for our Sunday services. Our first noon hour Eucharist will be on Tuesday, September 8. If you wish to attend, please enter through the yellow door off of Eugenie.

Sunday, September 13th, there will be a games night at St. Philip’s. Details of the evening can be found on the St. Philip’s Facebook page.

Sunday, September 20th, we will be holding our Fall BBQ. Our 11 am service will be Morning Prayer, and the BBQ will follow immediately. In addition to Morning Prayer, we will also be having a gospel sing as part of the service. The BBQ is a potluck. St. Philip’s provides the meat and buns and we encourage people to bring along a potluck dish to share. However, if you aren’t able to bring a dish, please do not let that stop you from coming to the BBQ.Hamburgers and Hot Dogs September

Later in the month, or perhaps in early October, Reverend Donald will be starting a series on Tuesday evenings called Confirm not Conform. This is a course put out by Forward Movement. If you are an adult seeking confirmation, this course would be good for you. However, the course is designed to encourage anyone who may wish to take a refresher course on the basics of Christian thought to participate. It promises to be informative and fun.

September Tenant Happenings:

St. Philip’s has a few tenants, and we want to make sure that you know about what they are up to.

The Green Door Alcoholics Anonymous group still meets in the choir room, Sundays at 8:00 am. Entrance is through the Green Door.

The Theotokos of the Life-Giving Spring Orthodox Mission meets Saturdays at 5:00 pm and Sundays 9:30 am. You can find out more about them from their webpage. Entrance is through the Red Door off the parking lot.

Brownies, Sparks, Guides, and Venturers:

Throughout its history, Girl Guides of Canada has prepared girls to meet the challenges that they face in their lives head on. Whether it was girls learning to bandage wounds during the First World War or girls today working on their anti-bullying badge, Guiding continually evolves to reflect the needs and interests of contemporary girls and women. Today, Guiding’s innovative programming is helping the next generation of Canadian girls become confident, courageous and resourceful leaders. Come Join us at St. Philips Anglican Church. https://register.girlguides.ca/web/OnlineReg/Unit_Search/OnlineReg/UnitSearch.aspx

153rd Sparks (ages 5-6) September 15 Guady Serrano guady.serrano@gmail.com 204-667-9560

153rd Brownies (ages 7-8) September 15 Doreen Gooding Doreen.Gooding@richardson.ca 204-294-0558

153rd Guides (ages 9-11) September 16 Gudrun Antosh Antosh@shaw.ca 204-222-8245

153rd Pathfinders (ages 12-14) September 16 Lauralee Gooding goola_dawin@hotmail.com 204-293-0258

153rd Rangers (ages 15-17) September 16 Lauralee Gooding goola_dawin@hotmail.com 204-293-0258

Adults (18+) call Gudrun Antosh for more information on joining this women’s organization (204-222-8245)

The Bolero Dance Theatre meets on Thursdays and Sunday evenings in the Memorial Hall. If you are interested in Spanish Dance, they are holding open auditions in late September. Entrance is through the Green Door.
Also on Thursday evenings, there is an Al-Anon meeting in the Lower hall. Entrance is through the Red Door off the parking lot.
Friday Evenings Celebrate Recovery meets. Entrance is through the Red Door off the parking lot.

 

Can Opener: Small but Important

We have a food cupboard here at St. Philip’s. It’s not much as such things go, but once in a while it enables us to help someone in need. Today someone came to our door in need of food. They told me (Rev. Donald) they couldn’t use canned goods because they had no can opener. I went up to see what I could do for them. Surveying what was on the shelf, almost all of it was in cans. I was about to go and tell them that I only had a couple of items when I looked on the top shelf, and what did I see? Two can openers.

Can opener
The remaining can opener.

That meant that I was able to give a much better variety of food to the people who had come asking. It also got me thinking about how the absence of such a little thing as a can opener can so limit the choices for people who struggle to meet their basic needs. Sometimes I find myself wondering about pop-top lids. I sometimes think that we want everything to be made easy for us. As if we find it to much work to use a can opener? Then I run into people like I met today and I realize that pop-top lids would help give them better choices for eating. It may still be a long way off from finding fresh food for everyone to eat, but it’s still closer than where many people are now. As the saying goes, “we might not be able to do everything, but we can all do something.”

I don’t know who left those can openers on the top of our food cupboard but I want to thank them for thinking about that little extra that might mean a lot to someone else. Maybe, the next time we’re thinking about making a donation to Winnipeg Harvest, we might want to add a can opener to our list.

Leadership for the Whole Church

Leardership for the Whole Church: Part 4 in the Series reflecting on Slow Church

Part 1:

Stanley Hauerwas and Slow Church

Part 2:

Practicing Presence

Part 3:

Formation in the Church

This is Part 4 of our series looking at the concept of Slow Church and what we can learn from the ideas of Stanley Hauerwas.  The links above will direct you to the first three posts in the series. This video is longer than the previous three. However, it’s worth watching the whole video.

Part 4 breaks away somewhat from the first 3 in that the post is more focused on leadership and leaders rather than on the whole body. Yet this video links well with the other three, precisely where Hauerwas talks about leadership as something that is best raised up through the community. Such leadership is in contrast to the leadership model touted by the book store best sellers.

The video starts off with Hauerwas stating that creative authority is all about persuasion.  While he talks about it in the context of being a leader in a community such as a church or university, one question it raises, is how do churches express creative authority in the communities in which they are situated?

For many years, the church spoke from a position of assumed authority. Within a Christendom model this was considered acceptable and even expected. As that model has disintegrated, can the church learn to speak authoritatively again.

Many people would question whether the church should ever speak authoritatively, but I think if the  church adopts the attitude in the broader community of helping the community to develop their gifts, the church will have something to offer to the whole community.

Hauerwas asks an interesting question: What kind of community do you need to be to choose your leaders by lot? The choosing of Matthias he is referring to can be found in Acts 1:12-26. How does such a question challenge our assumptions of what leadership and decision making in the Church should look like?

Hauerwas also talks about developing a discipline of the ego that will allow any institution that you are part of to continue once you have departed. I think this also fits in with the idea of being able to speak authoritatively in the broader community. Just as individual leaders need to learn the discipline of letting go of their egos, so do churches need to learn the same discipline.

One thing that comes out of this style of leadership, is that it rejects persuasion as a sales pitch. Persuasion under the model talked about in this video, and suggested by the previous videos is an activity that comes with long-term sharing of life and exchanging of ideas.

There is more in the video to consider regarding leadership. In particular the question of how do leaders hold on to power as a fragile thing? If you have any thoughts on any of this, please feel free to share them on the St. Philip’s Facebook page.

Important Dates in May.

Two Important Dates in the Month of May

It’s been a while since we’ve put anything new on the website here at St.Philip’s and we apologize for our lack of activity. However, a new month brings new possibilities, and hopefully we’ll have more to share over the coming days. May is particularly important because we celebrate two significant Holy Days. The first of these is Ascension and the second is Pentecost.

Ascension Day

Ascension Day is officially on Thursday, May 10. Here at St. Philip’s we are observing Ascension on the following Sunday, May 14th. Ascension marks the end of Jesus’s physical presence with the disciples and his return to the life of the Trinity with the Father and the Holy Spirit. The main accounts of the Ascension are found in Luke 24:44-53, and Acts 1:1-11. If you are looking for a brief and accessible primer on the Ascension and why it is important, I recommend my colleague and friend Dr. Tim Perry’s book, written with this brother Aaron, “He Ascended into Heaven.” If you wish to attend a service on Ascension Day itself, there is one being held at St. Mary Magdalene, 3 St. Vital Road.

Pentecost

The following Sunday, May 21st, is Pentecost Sunday. This is another one of the most important dates in the Church calendar. Here we celebrate the birthday of the church as it were. The story of Pentecost is found in Acts 2:1-21. The service is Holy Eucharist. Pentecost is also a Sunday for holding Baptisms. Baptism is a welcome into God’s family. In Baptism we also follow the example of Christ. If you are thinking you would like to learn more about Baptism, please feel free to contact Rev. Donald, either at revdonaldstpnorwood@shaw.ca, or leave a message on line 2 at 204-237-3650. Here is a link to Rev. Donald’s sermon on the Baptism of Christ.Bible Study, Important reading

 

Advent Through Christmas


This Sunday marks the beginning of Advent. During the four weeks before Christmas there will be a variety of opportunities to celebrate Advent at St. Philip’s. All of the Sunday services start at 11:00 am.

Advent 1 – November 30:

Our service will be at 11:00 am, with Rev. Donald preaching.

Advent 2 – December 7:

Sean Carlson, a parishioner of St. Margaret’s, will be making a presentation on the Ugandan Orphans Fund. This will take place during our 11 am Eucharist (BAS). After the service there will be a hot & cold potluck in the memorial hall. We invite you to stay for that. Hopefully Mr. Carlson will be able to speak more at that time, but if not, we can still share our thoughts, dreams and visions on how we can work with this fund.

Advent 3 – December 14:

St. Philip’s will be holding a service of Advent Lessons and Carols. Deacon Tanis and the choir have already been making their preparations for this morning.

Advent 4 – December 21:

Rev. Tanis will be preaching at this service. As part of the sermon she will be sharing some stories that will give us a glimpse into her work with Open Circle. As a deacon, Tanis helps the parish to take it’s place in the outside community. It will be exciting to listen to what has happened to Tanis, and where she has encountered God already at work in the lives of the people she meets.

About the Nave of St. Philip's, advent

Christmas Eve – December 24:

Our Christmas eve service begins at 7:30 pm. However, we invite people to arrive at 7:00 pm and join with us in a time of carol singing.

Christmas Day – December 25:

As with our Sunday services, our Christmas Day service will be held at 11:00 am. If for some reason you were able to make any of the Christmas Eve services available, we would be most happy to have you join us for Christmas morning.

As usual, we will have our Wednesday 1pm Eucharist each week during Advent. For any questions, please call 204-237-3650 line 2, or email the church at stphilipsnorwood@shaw.ca

 

Service of Remembrance

Yesterday was Remembrance Day. As we have for many years in the past, St. Philip’s played host to the Norwood-St. Boniface Legion for our annual Remembrance Day Service. This year given the tragic events in Ottawa and Quebec over the last few weeks, the service was even more poignant.

Wreathes for the service
Wreaths ready for the service.

The service itself was quite solemn. There were so many people there, that the aisles were full of people, dozens of whom stood for the entire service. There were representatives of all levels of government present, along with Donald Phillips, Bishop of the Diocese of Rupert’s Land.

It was also really encouraging to see large groups of children from Scout and Guide troops at all levels of those organization. Rememberance Day is about recalling the sacrifices that our ancestors made, but also about looking to a peaceful future. Peace though, is hard and costly, and it is good to see that message being passed on to future generations.

There were many people who worked hard and contributed to yesterday’s service. St. Philip’s would like to thank Nick Kolisnyk for his efforts on trumpet. The U 0f Winnipeg dancers under Stephanie Ballard’s leadership. Leslie MacCorby and the flute ensemble from Nelson McIntyre Collegiate, and all of the members of the youth service agencies who assisted before, during and after the service. Continue reading

Joy

http://erb.kingdomnow.org/stanley-hauerwas-the-virtues-practices-of-slow-church-video/7/

To view this video you are going to need to click on the link at the top of the post.

The video starts off with Hauerwas stating that joy is found in the existence of others, and that in the existence of the others we realize and recognize God’s existence. “Joy names the sheer presence of God.” How when we gather do we look for the joy that is an indicator of God’s existence. These gatherings don’t have to be the Sunday morning service, or in a church at all, although we certainly hope that we will be aware of God’s existence at those times. Yet, if we want people to encounter the living God revealed in Jesus Christ, we must be able to make that existence visible in the joy that people encounter when they meet us.

Hauerwas describes worship as the enjoyment of God. Is the enjoyment of God the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of worship? How does the presence of others in your community affect how you worship and the enjoyment of God you find in worship?

Finally Hauerwas states that “joy is the great enemy of narcissism.” When worshipping, do we find that it is easy to get distracted from the enjoyment of God and rather think about ourselves?

If you have any comments or questions, please feel free to include them at our Facebook page.

 

N T Wright on Life After Death

N T Wright is the former Bishop of Durham and one of the leading theologians writing today. This interview sponsored by Calvin College was done a couple of years ago. In this video talks about what resurrection and what it meant for the earliest disciples of Jesus, and what it means for us as Christians today. If this video raises any questions for you, please feel free to post them on the St. Philip’s Facebook Page.

If people are thinking about going to see the “Left Behind” movie, this video is a good choice to watch before going or shortly thereafter. While there are no explosions, and N T Wright isn’t a CGI creation (as far as we can tell), it would be a good idea to listen to or watch this video and discover how far from both the Biblical text and from early church thought and practice, the “Left Behind series wanders.

Roast Beef Dinner

November 11 is a major day here at St. Philip’s. In the morning we will be joining with the Norwood St. Boniface Legion as we commemorate Remembrance Day. We will be posting more details on that service as we approach the day. Then, in the evening, St. Philip’s hosts it’s annual Roast Beef Dinner. The Roast Beef Dinner is the highlight of the social calendar for St. Philip’s. This dinner is a great opportunity for people to come along and get to know the community that makes up St. Philip’s Anglican Church.

Roast Beef Dinner Menu:

Roast Beef

Baked Potatoes (with topping)

Roasted Root Vegetables

Coleslaw

Rolls

Dessert (The desserts will be a selection of homemade dainties, although there may be one or two pre-made treats to make sure everyone get enough.

Beverages

There will also be condiments such as horseradish and gravy to go along with the roast beef. If you are gluten-free, you will be happy to know that the gravy is being made with a gluten-free thickener, and we will have a supply of gluten-free rolls as well).

Tickets for the event are $20.00 for adults, and $8.00 for children under the age of 12. There will be one sitting for the dinner. This will be taking place at 5:30 pm. If you wish to reserve tickets for the dinner, please call the church at 204-237-3650(ext 2) or send us an email at stphilipsnorwood@shaw.ca

Site of the Roast Beef Dinner
This may look a little bare right now, but it will be full of people and activity and wonderful aromas on the night of the Roast Beef Dinner.

 

Eucharist at St. Philip’s

The Eucharist, also known as Holy Communion or the Lord’s Supper, is the primary act of corporate worship here at St. Philip’s.  Year round we celebrate the Eucharist together on most Sundays.  In months with 5 Sundays, the fifth Sunday will be Morning Prayer.  From September until June we also celebrate the Eucharist at 1 pm on Wednesdays.

On Sundays we use Eucharistic prayer number 5 from the Book of Alternative Services.  Whenever possible we sing this together as a congregation.

On Wednesdays, we read and discuss the lectionary readings for the upcoming week, in the place of a sermon. We follow an instructed Eucharist out of all bulletin provided by the Anglican Church of Canada. The Wednesday Eucharist is a said service.