Reflection on two Creeds of the Anglican Church

Last week Rev. Tanis wrote a piece on the congregational singing. This week we’re sharing some work she did, reflecting on two of the creeds that are a regular part of most Anglican services. The Apostle’s and Nicene Creeds. In a few days Rev. Donald will post on a third, though much less used, creed, The Athanasian (so-called)

Reflection on two Creeds of the Anglican Church

Rev. Deacon Tanis Kolisnyk

In our Sunday worship services in the Anglican Church here in Canada, we have the opportunity to say either the Apostle’s Creed or the Nicene Creed. Have you ever wondered why we have this as part of our service? I had the opportunity to do some reflection on this and to do some liturgical analysis to start to explore this a bit more. My question was – Why are Creeds important to us as Anglicans and why do we still have them in our services today?

Synaxis of the Twelve Apostles by Constantinople master

In Christian church history, the Creeds were useful in several ways and for some of those same reasons, they are important today. It is a public statement of faith, a standardized way in which people confess their faith in Jesus Christ. A creed is a concrete way to anchor the Christian faith and it ensures consistent beliefs from generation to generation. It was an anchor for the early church and for us today. Continue reading

Narrative @ Noon Eucharist

Last week St. Philip’s began a new weekday Eucharist. Earlier in the year Rev. Donald started taking Wednesday Noon services for Holy Trinity. At the time we decided to put our mid-week service on hiatus. Starting earlier this week, that service is back. There are some differences though. First, we will now be meeting on Tuesdays rather than Wednesdays. Second, we moved the time from 1:00 pm to Noon. Third, and the biggest change, we will be using the Narrative Lectionary (NL) for our Scripture readings.

Creation Narrative
The Narrative begins with creation.

What is a lectionary? A lectionary is a collection of Bible readings  that are pre-selected for every week of the year. It has it’s strengths and weaknesses, but one of the best things, is that it keeps preachers from getting on hobby horses where they preach a few select passages over and over. When that happens a lot of the Biblical story gets left out. However, even with the lectionary there are still large parts of the Bible that get less noticed.

Narrative Lectionary:

What is the Narrative Lectionary? You can read more about it at the Working Preacher site, but in a nutshell, it’s a lectionary that is based on the narrative of the Biblical story. So, every year the readings begin in the early chapters of Genesis. One of the features of the Narrative Lectionary is that it lays a greater emphasis on the Old Testament readings. Another feature is that the Narrative Lectionary works on a four year cycle. The Revised Common Lectionary (RCL) is on a three year cycle. In the RCL the Gospels of Mark and John share a year. In the Narrative Lectionary each Gospel gets a full year of focus. In addition, over the summer months, the Narrative Lectionary takes special care to focus on some of the lesser read Epistles and books of the Old Testament. As well, one month of the summer features a more topical theme for the lectionary.

This is not to say that one lectionary is better than the other. It does though, give us a chance to take a fresh look at Scripture. By using it on Tuesdays, it also means that people who happen to attend both Tuesdays and Sundays will get a chance to interact with more of the Biblical story throughout the year.

 

Advent Through Christmas


This Sunday marks the beginning of Advent. During the four weeks before Christmas there will be a variety of opportunities to celebrate Advent at St. Philip’s. All of the Sunday services start at 11:00 am.

Advent 1 – November 30:

Our service will be at 11:00 am, with Rev. Donald preaching.

Advent 2 – December 7:

Sean Carlson, a parishioner of St. Margaret’s, will be making a presentation on the Ugandan Orphans Fund. This will take place during our 11 am Eucharist (BAS). After the service there will be a hot & cold potluck in the memorial hall. We invite you to stay for that. Hopefully Mr. Carlson will be able to speak more at that time, but if not, we can still share our thoughts, dreams and visions on how we can work with this fund.

Advent 3 – December 14:

St. Philip’s will be holding a service of Advent Lessons and Carols. Deacon Tanis and the choir have already been making their preparations for this morning.

Advent 4 – December 21:

Rev. Tanis will be preaching at this service. As part of the sermon she will be sharing some stories that will give us a glimpse into her work with Open Circle. As a deacon, Tanis helps the parish to take it’s place in the outside community. It will be exciting to listen to what has happened to Tanis, and where she has encountered God already at work in the lives of the people she meets.

About the Nave of St. Philip's, advent

Christmas Eve – December 24:

Our Christmas eve service begins at 7:30 pm. However, we invite people to arrive at 7:00 pm and join with us in a time of carol singing.

Christmas Day – December 25:

As with our Sunday services, our Christmas Day service will be held at 11:00 am. If for some reason you were able to make any of the Christmas Eve services available, we would be most happy to have you join us for Christmas morning.

As usual, we will have our Wednesday 1pm Eucharist each week during Advent. For any questions, please call 204-237-3650 line 2, or email the church at stphilipsnorwood@shaw.ca