Eucharistic Eating

Eucharistic Eating (Lecture Series)

Purpose of the Series

To place our daily eating into the context of the Eucharist and to bring the Eucharist into our daily eating.

Thanksgiving (Eucharisto) is at the heart of Eucharistic eating.

Each lecture will move from the general idea of thanksgiving into the idea of thanksgiving in Holy Eucharist. Each of the potential ideas on any given week will be linked to thanksgiving.

The lectures will be held on Monday’s beginning on March 6, 2017. Lectures will begin at 7 pm and run until roughly 8:30 pm each week.

Eucharist - The Cup remembering

Week One – eucharistic eating

Small letters to indicate that the focus will be on the concept of thanksgiving more than on the Eucharistic Meal.

This week will also provide a general  overview of the series.

Week Two – Hunger

How does hunger prevent thanksgiving (and perhaps vice versa)

Hunger and Pain

Hunger as a weapon

Agony of starvation

Hunger as time consuming

Homelessness & hunger

Week Three – Dining Together

fraternal meals 

family dining

speed of life

Food Courts

Eucharist as meal of community

Week Four – Fasting-Feasting

Food moralism

The need for fasting/feasting

Week Five – Sacrifice & Death

All eating involves death

vegetarianism and veganism

Food as medicine

Christ’s sacrifice

Week Six – Eucharistic Eating

Historical Development of Eucharist

Shared Meal

Salvation in the Eucharist.

Presence

Some of the ideas found in various weeks may also apprear in other weeks, but I haven’t included them for brevity’s sake. This outline will undoubtedly change over the next 10 weeks, as further reading brings clarity of confusion.

Thoughts, comments, and questions welcomed.

An Example of Holiness – St. Philip

In the Catholic tradition when one is baptized they are given a “baptismal name.” The name is generally that of a Saint. These names serve as examples of holiness that point towards “the spiritual tradition and long history of the saints who have gone before [them] and whom the liturgy celebrates in the rhythms of the sanctoral cycle” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, Article 3, section 2030). The name points the bearer to the greater tradition they are a part of and shows how the Lord has worked through others before them. Similarly, when Churches are blessed or dedicated they are given a name that points to an example of holiness.

The example of holiness the has been bestowed upon our building and community is St. Philip the Apostle. St. Philip  was a resident of Bethsaida of Galilee. It was here that Jesus found and commanded Philip to, “follow him” (John 1:43). Philip then does an extraordinary thing; he shares the news of Christ to another, Nathanael (John 1:45-46). He does not understand Jesus’s message yet, and probably has had little time to converse with him, but he has seen the Christ. Philip could play things safe and let Jesus continue to meet and command people to follow him. However, Philip surprises us, and does not let doubt and his lack of knowledge keep him from sharing about Christ.

St. Philip, dragon slayer
Like Saint George, Saint Philip is said to have slain a dragon. This and other heroic deeds were later additions to his life story.

Continue reading

November Events Saint Philip’s

There are three events coming up at Saint Philip’s this November that you may be interested in.

The first two events take place on November 11th. These events start off with our Remembrance Day service at 11am. We are honoured that we get to share this day with the members of the St. Boniface-Norwood Legion Branch #43. There is a long history between Saint Philip’s and the Legion, and one which we strive to maintain. One thing to know about this Remembrance Day service is that you should arrive early if you need to sit, because the building fills to overflowing. Fortunately, as last year, there is televised overflow in our Memorial Hall. Continue reading

Kyle Mason Don Amero Visit

Lasting and healthy change is difficult to achieve because there are so many forces that work to keep change from happening. The societal, cultural, and/or personal forces must be resisted by the person or organization that decides the change they desire is necessary. However, most of the time it is not enough to simply make this decision and put forward this effort by oneself.  Support is often needed in these times of change so that the forces trying to stop it do not become overwhelming. St. Philips will be hosting two people who try to, Kyle Mason and Don Amero, at our 11am service on July 17th. These individuals have devoted themselves to be supporters of lasting and healthy change within their communities.

Kyle Mason North End Family Centre
The North End Family Centre, where Kyle Mason serves as director.

Kyle Mason

Before they arrive it would be good for us to get to know a bit about these men so they do not spend their whole time simply explaining who they are. Kyle Mason will be sharing a message with us when he visits on July 17th. Kyle Mason is Winnipeg born and was raised in the North End by a single parent family. As Kyle grew he noticed that it was not just his family that struggled with poverty but many throughout his community. During this tough time in his life Kyle Mason was able to find support and community from a local church youth group. Having a supportive community during a difficult time obviously stuck with Kyle as when he moved back to the community he knew exactly how he wanted to help it out.

Kyle Mason decided to help his community by starting the North End Family Centre. It is within this organization that Kyle, his staff, volunteers, and everyone who comes to the centre work on creating a loving and safe community. This community was formed by the North End Family Centre’s ability to hear the community they wished to serve. Kyle explains, “We listen to the people that we serve. We ask what they want and what they need and move to do that. And when the community feels like they have real input, which they do, they respond.” The response Kyle refers to is that despite only having a starting location 1000 square feet they were receiving up to 1400 visits a month. This response allowed the North End Family Centre to expand to their new location so they might serve more people and help support this ever growing community.

Don Amero

Don Amero, the Juno nominated man who will be providing the music to our service on July 17th, grew up in the North End community like Kyle Mason. Don Amero also is filled with the desire to give back to his community. With this desire in mind Don works in his local community; a good example of this is last year where Don took the responsibility on to help mentor some middle school kids at Niji Mahkwa. It is here the students collaborated with Don Amero to make a song about missing and murdered indigenous women titled, Never Alone.

Don also sees his community in a broader sense and has toured the country with country music star Brett Kissell last year. They toured through many indigenous communities to do their part to support the reconciliation conversation that was spreading throughout the country. Don Amero has this to say about reconciliation, “Reconciliation is relationship, and I think that what Brett and I want to do is be a living example of two guys from different hoods, different places, different backgrounds coming together to do something really great for people.”

The relationships these two men have formed with their communities is an inspiring story we will hear more of on July 17th. We hope many will come out to be inspired by their stories and song so that we can all figure out how we can help support change in our country, city, neighbours, and selves.

Williams: What is Church

The video with this post features former Archbishop of Canterbury discussing “What is the Church.” For those unfamiliar with the way the Anglican Church is organized, the Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader of Anglicans around the world. Unlike the Pope, the Archbishop of Canterbury has no formal power outside of his role in the Church of England. However, the Archbishop stands as a figure of unity for Anglicans. In this video, Williams answers the question what is the church. In doing so he gives a couple of comments that are worth further reflection.

Two Comments from Williams

The first comment in the video that this post will reflect on is: “Church is what happens when people are touched by Jesus.” Williams suggests that church is the inevitable by-product of coming into contact with Jesus. We who are part of the church are part of it because of this contact. The second is that our primary duty as part of the church is “to keep yourself alert to the call.” In other words, remember that encounter with Jesus. All other things flow from these two.

A couple of Questions:

Williams talks of people being brought together, often unexpectedly. What does this tell us about being the Church? What does this tell us about the basis of our commitment to each other? How does remembering that the church is an “event before an organization,” help or hinder us in being the Church? These are just a couple of questions that come to mind. Perhaps you have other questions after watching the video. Perhaps you disagree with Williams idea of the church. Feel free to use the contact form on our home page if you have any questions or comments regarding this video or any other post on our site.

I came across these videos thanks to an excellent site known as The Englewood Review of Books. This site and it’s sister site, Thrifty Christian Books are worth bookmarking if for no other reason than they will help you discover videos such as the one in this post. St. Philip’s has made use of this site in the past as they directed us to the Stanley Hauerwas videos which we posted a couple of years ago.

2016 Pancake Supper

It’s that time of year again. Lent is just around the corner. However, before that we will be enjoying the 2016 Pancake Supper. There will be a couple of changes for this year’s supper. The first is in whose putting it on. This year instead of simply being a St. Philip’s event, the Pancake Supper will be a joint effort by the three St. Mary’s Road Parishes. Those parishes are St. Mark’s, St. Mary Magdalene, and St. Philip’s. The second is the location of the supper. For 2016, we will be holding the Supper at the Norwood-St. Boniface Legion, Branch #43, which is located at 134 Marion Street.

2016 Bringing a new direction for the Pancake Supper

The reason for the change of locale brings us to the third big difference in this year’s Pancake Supper. This year, the funds raised through the supper will go to help support the Aulneau Renewal Centre’s new Family Sponsorship program. This is a new relatively new program from the centre. It recognizes that often the people who are in the greatest need of counseling services are unable to gain access to the services because of difficult financial situations. The Family Sponsorship Program will go a long way to helping to alleviate the stresses caused by a lack of funds. We hope that not only will the 2016 Pancake Supper raise funds to support this project, but it will help to raise awareness in the broader community of the availability of such a resource. Please consider taking the time on February 9th to come out, enjoy some pancakes, and help make much needed services available to people who need them.2016 Pancake supper1-page-001

Last year there were pancakes, sausages, syrup, whipped cream, and a berry compote on the menu. This year we hope to make the menu even bigger. Tickets are $7.00 per person and $17.50 per family.  We will be including gluten-free pancakes as part of the supper.

Tickets are available by calling 204-237-3650 and leaving a message. Or, you can email us at stphilipsnorwood@shaw.ca

 

Celebrate Recovery Merger

Celebrate Recovery

has merged with

Celebrate Recovery

@ Church of Christ,

one block away,

across the park.

We meet on Thursdays at 7pm at

170 St Mary Rd (door @ Parking).

See: www.stphilips-norwood.ca

St. Philip’s has been happy to be able to allow Celebrate Recovery to use our space for their meetings over the last few months. We hope that God continues to richly bless them and that lives continue to be transformed, as the two groups come together at Central Church of Christ.

Chili Cook-Off for Winnipeg Harvest

St. Philip’s is holding a Chili Cook-Off fundraiser on October 2nd, 2015. The cook-off will run from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. Fall brings about cooler weather, so it’s a good time to be thinking about hot food. The idea for the Chili Cook-Off came from one our parishioners and we talked about it we also talked about the idea of using it as a fundraiser. Given that the event will take place just before Thanksgiving, a fundraiser for Winnipeg Harvest seems liked a natural fit. So, the St. Philip’s Chili Cook-Off was born.

Chili Cook-off
The St. Philip’s Chili Cook-Off will be offering plenty of hot chili for a cool fall day.

This contest will not just be for bragging rights. There will be judges, and their will be prizes. The judges for the event will be voting for first, second, and third place. As well, we will be offering a people’s choice award where everyone who attends will get a chance to say which chili they liked best. We’ve started a Facebook Event page for the cook-off and will be posting information about the judges and the prizes as the next two weeks roll along. We’ll have some cooks from St. Philip’s but we’re looking for others to join us. Here’s how you can do that. Continue reading

September Happenings

As September approaches it is time for new events and for regular routines to return. We hope that everyone has had a restful summer that has allowed them time to recharge their batteries before the return of work or school and other weekly activities. Here at St. Philip’s we are in the planning stages for getting things off the ground. At the same time some of the groups that meet here at the church will be starting up their routines as well.

September Parish Happenings:

Earlier in the year, we put our Wednesday noon-hour Eucharist on hold. We will be starting it up again in the next few weeks with a couple of twists. The first is that it will be moved to Tuesday at Noon from Wednesday at One. The second is that we will be using the Narrative Lectionary, instead of the Revised Common Lectionary. This is to give our parish a chance to look at a different approach to the Lectionary. We will still be using the RCL for our Sunday services. Our first noon hour Eucharist will be on Tuesday, September 8. If you wish to attend, please enter through the yellow door off of Eugenie.

Sunday, September 13th, there will be a games night at St. Philip’s. Details of the evening can be found on the St. Philip’s Facebook page.

Sunday, September 20th, we will be holding our Fall BBQ. Our 11 am service will be Morning Prayer, and the BBQ will follow immediately. In addition to Morning Prayer, we will also be having a gospel sing as part of the service. The BBQ is a potluck. St. Philip’s provides the meat and buns and we encourage people to bring along a potluck dish to share. However, if you aren’t able to bring a dish, please do not let that stop you from coming to the BBQ.Hamburgers and Hot Dogs September

Later in the month, or perhaps in early October, Reverend Donald will be starting a series on Tuesday evenings called Confirm not Conform. This is a course put out by Forward Movement. If you are an adult seeking confirmation, this course would be good for you. However, the course is designed to encourage anyone who may wish to take a refresher course on the basics of Christian thought to participate. It promises to be informative and fun.

September Tenant Happenings:

St. Philip’s has a few tenants, and we want to make sure that you know about what they are up to.

The Green Door Alcoholics Anonymous group still meets in the choir room, Sundays at 8:00 am. Entrance is through the Green Door.

The Theotokos of the Life-Giving Spring Orthodox Mission meets Saturdays at 5:00 pm and Sundays 9:30 am. You can find out more about them from their webpage. Entrance is through the Red Door off the parking lot.

Brownies, Sparks, Guides, and Venturers:

Throughout its history, Girl Guides of Canada has prepared girls to meet the challenges that they face in their lives head on. Whether it was girls learning to bandage wounds during the First World War or girls today working on their anti-bullying badge, Guiding continually evolves to reflect the needs and interests of contemporary girls and women. Today, Guiding’s innovative programming is helping the next generation of Canadian girls become confident, courageous and resourceful leaders. Come Join us at St. Philips Anglican Church. https://register.girlguides.ca/web/OnlineReg/Unit_Search/OnlineReg/UnitSearch.aspx

153rd Sparks (ages 5-6) September 15 Guady Serrano guady.serrano@gmail.com 204-667-9560

153rd Brownies (ages 7-8) September 15 Doreen Gooding Doreen.Gooding@richardson.ca 204-294-0558

153rd Guides (ages 9-11) September 16 Gudrun Antosh Antosh@shaw.ca 204-222-8245

153rd Pathfinders (ages 12-14) September 16 Lauralee Gooding goola_dawin@hotmail.com 204-293-0258

153rd Rangers (ages 15-17) September 16 Lauralee Gooding goola_dawin@hotmail.com 204-293-0258

Adults (18+) call Gudrun Antosh for more information on joining this women’s organization (204-222-8245)

The Bolero Dance Theatre meets on Thursdays and Sunday evenings in the Memorial Hall. If you are interested in Spanish Dance, they are holding open auditions in late September. Entrance is through the Green Door.
Also on Thursday evenings, there is an Al-Anon meeting in the Lower hall. Entrance is through the Red Door off the parking lot.
Friday Evenings Celebrate Recovery meets. Entrance is through the Red Door off the parking lot.

 

Leadership for the Whole Church

Leardership for the Whole Church: Part 4 in the Series reflecting on Slow Church

Part 1:

Stanley Hauerwas and Slow Church

Part 2:

Practicing Presence

Part 3:

Formation in the Church

This is Part 4 of our series looking at the concept of Slow Church and what we can learn from the ideas of Stanley Hauerwas.  The links above will direct you to the first three posts in the series. This video is longer than the previous three. However, it’s worth watching the whole video.

Part 4 breaks away somewhat from the first 3 in that the post is more focused on leadership and leaders rather than on the whole body. Yet this video links well with the other three, precisely where Hauerwas talks about leadership as something that is best raised up through the community. Such leadership is in contrast to the leadership model touted by the book store best sellers.

The video starts off with Hauerwas stating that creative authority is all about persuasion.  While he talks about it in the context of being a leader in a community such as a church or university, one question it raises, is how do churches express creative authority in the communities in which they are situated?

For many years, the church spoke from a position of assumed authority. Within a Christendom model this was considered acceptable and even expected. As that model has disintegrated, can the church learn to speak authoritatively again.

Many people would question whether the church should ever speak authoritatively, but I think if the  church adopts the attitude in the broader community of helping the community to develop their gifts, the church will have something to offer to the whole community.

Hauerwas asks an interesting question: What kind of community do you need to be to choose your leaders by lot? The choosing of Matthias he is referring to can be found in Acts 1:12-26. How does such a question challenge our assumptions of what leadership and decision making in the Church should look like?

Hauerwas also talks about developing a discipline of the ego that will allow any institution that you are part of to continue once you have departed. I think this also fits in with the idea of being able to speak authoritatively in the broader community. Just as individual leaders need to learn the discipline of letting go of their egos, so do churches need to learn the same discipline.

One thing that comes out of this style of leadership, is that it rejects persuasion as a sales pitch. Persuasion under the model talked about in this video, and suggested by the previous videos is an activity that comes with long-term sharing of life and exchanging of ideas.

There is more in the video to consider regarding leadership. In particular the question of how do leaders hold on to power as a fragile thing? If you have any thoughts on any of this, please feel free to share them on the St. Philip’s Facebook page.